5 Talking Points for New Customers and Your Online Audience

Carolyn Canetti
Feb 3, 2020 1:30:02 PM

Share what you know — try answering these 5 questions as you think about writing your website, creating your social media accounts, and speaking with your first customers:

1) What service or knowledge do you have that people hire you for?
So… what do you do? What is your offering? Write 3 sentences about what you help people with and the topic that you know the most about. Now, write 1 sentence that includes the same value proposition. Get in the habit of concisely explaining you and your business.

2) What are questions that people ask you to explain or help with?
When talking to a potential customer, what are you providing answers to that your customers can’t understand or do themselves? Come up with a list of these questions and answer them over and over again. Run those answers by a trusted friend or family member and see if it makes sense to them.

3) What frustrates your customer base?
What about the service you provide frustrates your customer? Be it, the process itself, self motivation, or not seeing results they like. What are ways that leave a customer dissatisfied? Which of these do you have control over? Make a list of things that you have control over (timely communication, access to additional resources, etc) and set clear expectations up front about what you do and don’t do.

If you’re a developer, and the alternative is a technology, get acquainted with your competition.

4) If your customers don’t hire you, what are they doing instead?
If you’re don’t end up being chosen for work, what are the other options? Is it another person that they’re going with? Is it a tool or service that they can use instead? Is it that they don’t need it enough, can’t pay for it, or had misaligned expectations? Ask for feedback. It’s the only way to do better.

If you’re a developer, and the alternative is a technology, get acquainted with your competition.

5) What happens when they’re not a customer any more?
It’s inevitable that eventually a customer will no longer be your customer. Think about how to exit a relationship with a customer gracefully and positively. Keep the lines of communications open, ask for a review or testimonial, and encourage them to refer their own friends or family.


Having people reach out to you for your services is incredibly exciting and motivating. Take the time to do a bit of thinking about what happens next and later too!

 

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Topics: Marketing, Branding, Customers,